, Singapore
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7 in 10 workers believe pay gaps exist in Singapore

According to workers, the most common type of pay gap is based on age.

Most (70%) Singaporeans believe that pay gaps exist in the state, a survey by Milieu Insight showed.

According to workers, the most common types of pay gaps are based on age (73%), gender (69%), and nationality (61%).

A quarter of employees (25%) believe that a way to tackle the issue of discriminatory pay gaps is by having pay transparency in job listings.

More than half of them (59%) also believe that making it compulsory for employers to state the pay range in their job listings will benefit job seekers since they will know how much they should be paid based on their experience or qualifications (79%).

Those surveyed, however, are split on whether pay transparency would benefit employers, with 33% saying it will be beneficial for them, and 31% saying it will put them at a disadvantage.

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