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Pure Storage receives SBR award for IT Storage - IT Services

Its Pure as-a-Service delivers storage as a true utility model, and combines industry-leading performance with financial flexibility.

By offering the first-of-its-kind unified subscription for fast, flexible resources that fit modern operating environments, Pure Storage's Pure as-a-Service platform helps organisations pay for the exact capacity they need. At the same time, they are able to leverage off the same performance and availability they would normally have in a traditional cloud desktop.

Singapore Business Review (SBR) acknowledges the significance of such trailblazing innovation, especially in businesses that are replacing their antiquated storage systems with better and more flexible technology. The Technology Excellence Awards (TEA) was launched to uncover winners whose main work was shaped by innovation, idiosyncrasy, success, influence and dynamism. In this spirit, Singapore Business Review has awarded Pure Storage the 2021 SBR TEA trophy in the IT Storage - IT Services category.

Pure Storage, the IT pioneer that delivers storage as a service, launched its Pure as-a-Service platform in the ASEAN region last year. Pure as-a-Service is a Storage-as-a-Service (STaaS) model that delivers businesses' capacity and performance resources through a simple subscription. One key difference that Pure as-a-Service has over competitors is its ability to unify both on-premise and public cloud storage resources into a single data storage subscription for a true hybrid cloud experience.

By offering operating expenditure (OPEX) agility, STaaS allows customers to pay for the storage they need — and when they need it. Just like paying electricity or water bills, customers only pay for what they need when they use the platform.

This feature not only helps businesses customise their storage needs depending on their current budget, but it also allows them to have complete control over where their data resides, unlike traditional STaaS models.

Said Andrew Sotiropoulos, Vice President, Asia Pacific & Japan, Pure Storage: “The past 15 months have seen organisations of all sizes accelerating their digital transformation journeys and it is critical for them to have the flexibility to scale up or down depending on their needs. Pure as-a-Service gives them that agility.”

Pure as-a-Service also brings transparency to the oftentimes opaque world of enterprise data centers and cloud infrastructure. Pure as-a-Service pricing is freely available on Pure Storage’s website, allowing customers to see what their suggested retail price is for either on-premise or cloud-storage consumption. While some discounts and promotions can help lessen the cost, there’s still that basic foundation and level of transparency when it comes to pricing that customers can return to.

Throughout the last year, Pure saw increased customer adoption in every key market globally. In Q4 FY21 alone, new Pure as-a-Service customers included major cloud providers, financial institutions, hospitals, telecommunications companies, and more, including a customer with a Pure as-a-Service commitment of more than US$10M. Pure’s annual subscription services revenue, which includes Pure as-a-Service and Evergreen and makes up more than 30% of total revenues, exceeded US$500M in FY21, representing 33% year-over-year growth.

Pure as-a-Service has been very important for Pure and even more important are the benefits for their customers. Many like the flexible nature of the offering that frees up capital expenditure for other investments. Moreover, Pure as-a-Service has prompted other competitors to rethink their STaaS offerings which benefits the industry as a whole.

The Technology Excellence Awards, presented by Singapore Business Review, was held via studio award presentations and video conferencing sessions throughout the second and third week of April.

This year’s nominations were judged by a panel consisting of Daryl Pereira, Head of Cyber at KPMG; Cheang Wai Keat, Partner, Consulting at Ernst & Young Advisory Pte. Ltd.; Henry Tan, Group Chief Executive Officer and Chief Innovation Officer at Nexia TS; Sivakumar Saravan, Senior Partner at Crowe Singapore; Cecil Su, Director, Head of Cybersecurity of BDO Singapore.

If you would like to join the 2022 awards and be acclaimed for your company’s exceptional technological innovations, please email Jane Patiag at jane@charltonmediamail.com.

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